Posts Tagged ‘human rights’

h1

Women have human minds

March 31, 2013

So here’s the poster in English. We need to stop this nonsense explaining human intelligence in terms of our sexual organs! 0_0 How can this have been so popular? It’s a crime against humanity, some profound damage to human intelligence.

womenhavehumanminds_poster (1 doc page)

Recommended reading: Delusions of Gender, by Cordelia Fine but just looking around in societies where women are free to develop their minds and lives can do.

And in case you want to repost and stuff, here’s the text — the “wimmin” is to help EFL students to remember how to pronounce the plural of “woman” /woomn/, but it’san actual alternative spelling of th word too:

WIMMIN HAVE HUMAN MINDS
STOP IT: THE PENIS & THE VAGINA
are reproductive and sexual organs
unfit to measure our intelligence
establish our emotional & social functions
or our dreams & ambitions

(WHY) HAVEN’T WE MISSED
women thinkers, artists, activists, explorers, inventors, adventurers…
in the history of HUMANKIND?

The history of Man is not the history of Humankind

Patriarchy to court
for Crimes against Humanity

h1

On Social activism and Achievement

March 12, 2013

Today Rubén (Avanzado 2 Martes) asked me what had we achieved when I was volunteering as a pacifist in a project in a country at war. This question is complex and deserves and analysis I have no time or mind to make just now! And the answer is as complex!! It’s like a few galaxies put together!

So I’d like to hint at possible answers with an analogy: what does a teacher achieve in a school year? Do we measure their achievement in terms of number of students who pass their finals? The teaching-learning experience is like an amazing journey. Wouldn’t this kind of measurement be far too poor? The teacher-student relationship is a very particular and amazing kind of relationship, when it actually has chances of developing. Do you believe that people passing exams would mirror achievement?

Helping people pass an exam if a very small part in my work as a teacher. My work is precious, far more complex, and this does not mean I ignore “the problem” (exams), and it doesn’t mean either all I do is well done. So I cannot measure my achievement as a teacher just by thinking of how many students passed their finals. If you ask me, as a teacher, I mean, I have to say I don’t know how to measure it because teaching is a very complex activity. But I do have a guiding star — I always try to offer the best of what I’m capable of, and this does not exclude paying attention, interacting, listening, and making mistakes, for mistakes are opportunities for discovery and exploration — and therefore for unexpected learning! When the year comes to an end, as a teacher, I’m exhausted and heartbroken because all of those very rich connections you have enjoyed throughout the year end. But then, a new stage begins: the new learning that holidays bring about, and this time you’re not in charge! And next, a new exciting school year, full of people to meet, to work with!

As a social activist, the first area of my achievement is myself. I profit from all my work for society, because I dissent and give myself the chance to grow, to pursue ideals and learn to live inspired by them! And how can I measure the rest? Should I say, “In Guatemala, our work helped many people not be kidnapped by death squads, tortured and murdered, and these people in turn, worked their lives out to bring a betterment to their society.” As you can see it’s getting harder to nail down… I could also say, “In Guatemala I learned about how to work through nonviolence for the betterment of society in the face of Low Intensity Warfare.” Hard to nail down, right? I could say, “X is alive because we helped,” much more specific, but — is this a self-contained description of my (our) achievement? Is this it? No, it isn’t. There is so much more! But I simply cannot explain comprehensively!

Here there is / was my first attempt to think in terms of achievement, and as I can see, I totally failed anyway! (oh, and here is Asking Questions in Church, btw!)

In a nutshell, I am my only “achievement,” a human being in interaction with other human beings, and the struggle never ends! 🙂

AFTERTHOUGHT: Perhaps, the deep reason is that actions in social activism are not about “convincing people to follow a certain ideology”, but “helping us all to build a less violent and unfair world”!

h1

Celebrating March 8: what’s so good about the human rights concept?

March 8, 2013

I certainly believe that December 10 should be an international holiday. You have to consider that it’s taken us till the 20th century to understand that all human beings have the same rights. Before we managed this idea, some people were considered worthless and some others the representatives of God on the planet, or those who could exploit and abuse feeling totally entitled to do so. Obviously, reaching this understanding cannot wipe out all the harm that the parameters that built societies for centuries constructed. But this is just a beginning, the beginning of a better way to organize societies.

Before we coined “human rights” it was religion organizing societies and what men and women could do in life, their roles, what their hopes and dreams should be. Today most people understand that religion and spirituality should not organize society, for those are private issues, to share with like-minded people, but not to impose on the population. We are learning to respect non-believers and also different kinds of religions or spiritual options.

The genius of the human rights notion is that both believers and non-believers can be able to accept it and respect it.

It is true that patriarchal monotheist religions are having a harder time with this notion, because their dogmas have assigned gender roles to human beings, and women have always been seen and treated as inferior — intelectually, emotionally, spirituality — and a source of evil. But numerous people who believe in those religions are moving beyond those dogmas. They are refusing to believe that it was women who brought suffering to the world, they are refusing to believe that sexual intercourse should exclude pleasure, or that women should have as many children as God sends them. They’re challenging many religious impositions and they’re trying to build a kind of spirituality consistent with the human rights notion.

On March 8, International Women’s Day, as a feminist, as someone who understands human rights, I’d like to post this little thought of mine in celebration of it all!

Venus 21st century: “You understand women have human rights, but you don’t need to develop a feminist intelligence of world? How come? (What a sad violent and pointless war)”

venusfeministapostal

h1

A Letter from Eve Ensler, from Congo

March 7, 2013

http://www.vday.org/dearall

 

h1

Palestinians have HUMAN rights

November 23, 2012

Lost for words. I started following this issue in 1980, when I started my activism (volunteer work) as a translator and a member of Amnesty International in the Middle East group. It’s such a nightmare of abuse after abuse after abuse till genocide till never-ending hell on earth.

The other day I wrote a poem in Spanish (I’ll post it as a comment here), and I’ll try to translate it the best I can into English here (I might be editing it some day! Keep changing things) for you unexpected lovely net surfers! I was so surprised when you dropped by. I’m not very good at blogging, though. Anyway, thanks for reading! 🙂  I wrote this poem after watching a beautiful documentary on Palestinian teachers and musicians, who were improvising a school of music and dance. When you can be bombed or crushed in so many other ways, LIFE is NOW.

Stop genocide! War is not inevitable! Religions should be about each person’s spirituality, OUT OF POLITICS NOW! Once we’ve created and understood the notion “human rights” it’s anachronic to keep giving religions the power of deciding over people’s lives and deaths!


Olive Trees

Olive skin is gold and green.
Eyes and hair black night rain
and so deep,
like summer in jasmine bushes.
Leaves are ash green underneath
and turn twist to the open sky,
once and again and again
making such an effort, feeling such pain,
and slightly shiny on top,
like a memory
of olive oil and hands, of the time
when we could plant olive trees, see them grow.

Music is banned.
(It’s law in the democracy of genocide)
Young persons do not fear more
than they love — that’s why they sing
in some secret space among the rubble.
Rubble in the back of their eyes,
storming on the olive trees under the sun,
on the yellow ground worn out exhausted
desert-like, rocky, hard, persistent; turned myrrh,
and they learn to play with boxes and string
and they risk their lives because they are dancing.

This is what you will never learn from reading
the chronicles the fathers of all the wars write.

%d bloggers like this: