Posts Tagged ‘crisis’

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About Spain (Forcades and Oliveres)

April 26, 2013

From Jeff Ngyen’s blog, Deconstructing Myths, “It’s harder not to“:

In Spain, a voice of conscience can be heard among the people. Sister Teresa Forcades and indignado leader, Arcadi Oliveres, published a manifesto that called for the “nationalization of banks and energy firms, housing rights and tough measures against corruption”. The indignado protests have risen as a nonviolent movement to speak out against the economic grenades being lobbed at the country by way of the austerity policies of the Troika (EU/ECB/IMF). As in other countries where austerity has been implemented, brutal economic mandates have led to social upheaval as wage and food insecurity and debt cripple families and individuals across the age, gender and ethnic spectrums. The indignados have sent a clear message what their opinions are on austerity for the many and prosperity for the few. Typically, the response to the encampment in public spaces by the protesters has been met with police force just as it was in America against the Occupy movement. Unlike Europe, the pepper spraying, mass arrests and beat downs of Occupy members was met with crickets in the United States as Americans just wanted to get back to some semblance of a normal life, i.e., watching Honey Boo Boo and shopping for GMO milk and honey. As someone who has been critical of the church for their deafening silence in the face of the financial coup staged by the bankers and billionaires, I must give props to Sister Forcades. Every voice is needed in the battle for the hearts and minds of the people.

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Talking about the crisis

April 9, 2013

EFL students should not say

The main responsible for the crisis is the government

The responsible is…

Also the responsible are business people / multinationals / the wealthy (“the wealthy” is correct, yes)

This is WRONG in English

What can we say?

Post freely! We’ll appreciate! 🙂 And you could also be helping us improve this section on Talking People. Thanks!

http://www.talkingpeople.net/tp/usefullanguage/everydaylang/responsibility.htm

Apart from this I have a question:  There’s widespread corruption among politicians, apparently. Well, that should be fixed, and we should fight to get that fixed. And get the money back. Then the political system needs relevant improvements. Consequently, we should put pressure so that this happens. But if we discard Politics as our way of organizing societies, which are the options? Should we go back to the military organizing our society (dictatorships)? Or further back to having religious leaders organizing society (they still have too much a say considering we are meant to respect women’s human rights. Anyway)?

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In Madrid…

April 3, 2013

In Madrid, the PP (Spanish right-wing political party) government has attacked the public healthcare system and workers’ rights, for instance, by making pensioners pay for their meds, and discounting money from the salary of workers who are on a sick leave!! It’s all about the cuts. However, how can this be explained?! the Treasure/Department of Treasure — the tax department, so to say — will allow “discounts” if you have gambling debts!!! — which means, that it’s more important to protect people losing money in gambling than to protect people’s health and people’s labor rights.

What does this have to do with a democracy? The people who have amassed fortunes their families would never in a million years be able to spend are consistently protected by our political leaders, in spite of the fact that they are destroying people, culture, civilization and the planet. It’s like back to Medieval Ages!

How is this going to solve the crisis? Madrid will be EuroVegas, a place, as we know, that won’t be about offering jobs respecting human rights and labor rights, but about creating that kind of underworld which has also attracked all kinds of crimes and exploitation of human beings. This is their idea of measures to overcome the crisis. I feel sick, with such lack of ethics and commitment to human beings.

Let people be evicted from their homes, go without healthcare, let public education become a place where teachers are objects voicing a same textbook at the same time (good for publishing houses, again, bad for connecting education to life outside because it’s impossible to develop projects!), and protect the decent abusers. Shame on them!

This is the new war — no weapons, no battlefields, but all about sheer violence.

http://economia.elpais.com/economia/2013/04/01/agencias/1364797814_363149.html

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The sequester’s defense cuts aren’t that scary

March 9, 2013

Why use “sequester” instead of “cuts”? You’re welcome to post! Thanks!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/11/20/the-sequesters-defense-cuts-arent-that-scary-in-one-graph/

Military-spending-sequester

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2013/02/26/obama_on_sequester_cuts_theres_no_smart_way_to_do_that.html

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What can people do to solve the crisis? (Brainstorming)

March 5, 2013

First, it’s important to find accurate analyses, local, national and also macroeconomic. People have produced a lot of riches with their work and a minority has amassed unbelievable amounts of money, and this should be exposed and those people should start giving back to the populations on the planet.

We should also share the information we find, and discuss it.

We could support the people who are offering constructive analyses and taking initiatives which reclaim democracy, initiatives like the one to solve the housing problem arising from evictions. With this I mean, we can help with our own signatures.

We could help gather signatures, too.

At a more local level, we should support going local: we should support local businesses, and local production, as consumers. Investing money in local businesses creates employment, investing one’s saving in buying a house does not.

We should pay our IVA tax (VAT tax). The taxes on what we consume are used to fund the public system!

Of course, we can demand tax policies become people-friendly instead of exploiting the ones who have the lowest salaries!!

Find out what people are doing in your area. Consider that social activists are people who devote their time and effort to build a better world. See what they are up to, in case you can learn about something or even find projects you can join.

If we find no jobs, we could try to get together with other unemployed people to see if we would be able to set up a small business, to earn a living, at least, to get by!

We should demand the government prosecute corrupt business people, bankers and politicians. In this way, there would be much more money, employment and social justice. We would be defending democracy, reclaiming democracy.

We could create ways in which people giving some money could help the most needed. Like trade unions in the past, when every worker put some money so that workers on strike, fighting for everybody’s rights, could get by.

Organize or help organize a meeting point where people in your area can exchange goods and services. Organize a jumble sale — donate things you don’t need, so that they can sold at a cheap price, and so that all the money collected in this way helps the needy. Donate what you don’t need to charities, if you can’t find or create any of this.

Charities — not NGOs, but places that have always assisted the homeless, for instance — alleviate individual suffering, and this is precious, but they do not achieve structural change. So don’t think only in terms of “giving to the poor” — we also need to change something in how our societies work, and that’s why we should get more involved in constructing democracy.

The government should create policies that made it impossible for the richest people to take their money out of the country. The world of football has corrupt people too, but the richest people are not necessarily in the public eye, especially when they are corrupt.

We should demand policies that encourage the creation of small businesses, and also policies that encourage the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Check out the environmental movement — they’ve got zillions of ideas on how to do this.

One thing is certain: go to demos, attend people’s assemblies. Join Nonviolent Direct Actions in places where people are defending what’s fair/just. This is precious for a democracy!

I have found a site collecting more ideas: http://www.advantagein.com/politics/economiccrisis.htm
We should also get information of how people are managing in Greece and Iceland!

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